Conyers Loses Appeal to Get on Ballot

Image: Conyers Loses Appeal to Get on Ballot

Friday, 23 May 2014 02:13 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

Rep. John Conyers, No. 2 in seniority in the House, lost his appeal Friday to get on the August primary ballot after Michigan election officials found problems with the Democrat's nominating petitions.

The Secretary of State's office affirmed a decision by Detroit-area election officials to keep Conyers off the ballot.

But the decision does not necessarily end Conyers' 50-year career in Congress as his campaign manager has said Conyers would mount a write-in effort if necessary in the heavily Democratic district.

There is precedent in Michigan for such an effort. Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan launched a successful write-in campaign in last year's primary after his name was kept off the ballot due to a residency issue.

Conyers also has mounted a legal challenge to have the Michigan election law at the heart of the dispute declared unconstitutional, and a federal judge is expected to rule later Friday.

"The Secretary of State made her decision, and we'll live with it," said Bert Johnson, Conyers' campaign chair and a Democratic state senator. "Obviously, we disagree, and we'll wait for the federal court to rule."

Conyers, 85, had appealed to the state after Wayne County officials said there were problems with some people who collected signatures. The circulators weren't registered to vote or had listed a wrong registration address.

That can spoil petitions, under Michigan law, and as a result Conyers lacked the 1,000 signatures necessary to get on the ballot.

"A circulator's failure to register is a fatal defect that renders all signatures appearing on a petition he or she circulated invalid," the Secretary of State's review said Friday.

Ending Conyers' career that way would be "pretty outrageous," his lawyer, John Pirich, said this week.

Political opponents said Conyers should follow election procedures like other candidates. An attorney for a Democratic challenger, the Rev. Horace Sheffield III, said Conyers for decades had no problem following the law.

"In essence, they played the game, lost and then complained that the rules were unfair," Eric Doster said, quoting a Virginia judge.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
You May Also Like

Karl Rove: Obama Encourages Impeachment Talk to Raise Funds

Tuesday, 29 Jul 2014 21:13 PM

President Barack Obama is encouraging Republicans to call for his impeachment to "fatten the bank accounts of Democratic . . .

Rand Paul Will Write Another Book Before 2016 Election

Tuesday, 29 Jul 2014 21:02 PM

Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul says he intends in 2015 to pound out a book - and decide whether to take a run for th . . .

Newt Gingrich: Obama Trying to Provoke GOP to Impeach Him

Tuesday, 29 Jul 2014 17:32 PM

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich eviscerated President Barack Obama's "pathetic presidency" Tuesday, saying any execu . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved