Rep. Hastings Announces Retirement In Wake of Debt-Ceiling Vote

Image: Rep. Hastings Announces Retirement In Wake of Debt-Ceiling Vote

Thursday, 13 Feb 2014 10:33 PM

By Todd Beamon

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Rep. Doc Hastings on Thursday became the latest House Republican to announce his retirement — two days after he was part of a critical coalition of House leaders, made up of retiring GOP members and representatives primarily from Northeastern states, that backed a controversial bill to raise America's debt ceiling without restrictions.

"Last Friday, I celebrated my 73rd birthday, and while I have the ability and seniority to continue serving central Washington, it is time for the voters to choose a new person with new energy to represent them in the people's House," Hastings said in a statement.

First elected in 1995, Hastings is chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee and recently called for overhauling the Endangered Species Act, charging that the 40-year-old law has been abused by environmental groups seeking to restrict development in the name of species protection.

The announcement came a day after GOP Rep. Gary Miller, 66, of California said that he was retiring after more than 15 years in the House because of family issues.

Hastings is now the 24th member of Congress to say that this year would be his last. He joins 13 Republicans and 11 Democrats to disclose their impending departures from Capitol Hill.

In the House, he is the 11th Republican and 18th member overall to announce his retirement.

But on Tuesday, Hastings and Miller joined with Speaker John Boehner, Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy and 23 other House Republicans to support a one-year extension of the nation's borrowing authority — agreeing to President Barack Obama's demands for a debt-limit increase without any conditions.

Boehner backed the legislation, which won on a 221-201 vote. Two Democrats, John Barrow of Georgia and Jim Matheson of Utah, joined the GOP in rejecting it.

Besides splitting the House leadership — the No. 4 Republican, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers of Washington state, the highest-ranking House GOP woman, was among the leaders to vote "no" — the vote rankled conservatives, tea party supporters and rank-and-file Republicans.

The Senate Conservatives Fund even charged that Boehner should be replaced as speaker.

These groups were further outraged the next day when the Senate voted — after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, of Kentucky, and Minority Whip John Cornyn, of Texas, led an assault on a filibuster by Sen. Ted Cruz — to pass a similar debt bill on a straight 55-43 party-line vote.

In the House, the 28 Republicans voting for the measure included six who are retiring at the end of the year. Besides Hastings and Miller, they are Howard Coble, N.C.; Buck McKeon, Calif.; Jon Runyan, N.J.; and Frank Wolf, Va.

"You've got retirees, the leadership and Republicans in safe districts with a Northeastern bias," political analyst and pollster Doug Schoen explained to Newsmax on Thursday.

"Basically, the votes they gave were enough to get it passed — and they didn't want to put anyone at risk," he added. "It was retirees, leadership, and Northeastern moderate Republicans who could take the vote without a problem."

Others in the top House leadership who supported the debt ceiling bill included Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp, Mich.; Oversight Committee Chairman Darrell Issa, Calif.; Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers, Ky.; and Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce, Calif.

Those Northeastern Republicans on board included four from New York — Reps. Chris Collins, Michael Grimm, Richard Hanna, Peter King — as well as three each from neighboring New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Seven California House members backed the measure.

"Put it another way: For the Republican base, this is toxic — and the way the process was organized was to insulate the party and its grass-roots as much as possible to avoid any political problems," Schoen told Newsmax.

The primary problem was avoiding another federal government shutdown, similar to the partial one that lasted 16 days in October and cost taxpayers $1.4 billion — especially when the GOP could possibly retake the Senate in this fall's congressional elections.

"It goes back to their basis thesis: We get through this. We don't fight on an issue we can't win because, ultimately, this election is moving in our direction — and we don't need to have a problem like the problem we had with the government shutdown."

Political strategist Dick Morris described the House skirmishing on Thursday as "phony" and "fraudulent."

"Boehner went to his caucus and said: 'Hey guys, let's approve the debt limit in return for pretty-good spending cuts or other restorations,'" Morris told John Bachman on "America's Forum" on Newsmax TV. "The House Republicans said, or enough of them said: 'We're not going to vote for a debt-limit increase under any circumstance. You could balance the whole budget and we're not going to go for it.'

"He didn't have his 218 votes to pass it — and he couldn’t get any Democratic votes if there were cuts," Morris said of Boehner.

The Ohio Republican then put together the GOP coalition to support the clean bill.

"All of these Republican congressmen can now go to their primary opponents from the tea party and say, 'Hey, I voted against raising the debt limit' — knowing darn well that they were willing to vote for it if they needed it," Morris said.

Schoen saw it another way.

"The Republican Party did not want to vote to increase the debt ceiling," he said. "Because they are in the majority, they had to provide some votes — in this case, 28 — to go along with near-unanimous Democratic support to get it done.

"The leadership understood that it was in their interest, long-term, to increase the debt ceiling without any riders or any possibility of paralyzing the government," Schoen added. "The vast majority of Republicans, for a variety of reasons, disagree.

"For John Boehner, this became a practical step to avoid more political harakiri."

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