Tags: US | Iraq | Airlines

FAA Prohibits US Airlines From Flying Over Iraq

Friday, 08 Aug 2014 08:05 PM

 

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

The Obama administration ordered U.S. airlines not to fly over Iraq following the first U.S. airstrikes there Friday, while carriers from other nations said they were suspending service to the Iraqi city of Irbil because of the hostilities.

A Federal Aviation Administration notice to pilots says the ban was prompted by the "potentially hazardous situation created by fighting between militants" associated with the Islamic State group and "Iraqi security forces and their allies."

The ban applies to all U.S.-registered planes except those operated by foreign carriers and to FAA-licensed pilots. Flights operated with U.S. government permission and for emergency situations are exempt. The FAA previously allowed limited flights over Iraq to altitudes above 30,000 feet.

Delta Air Lines spokesman Morgan Durrant said the airline stopped flying over Iraq several weeks ago. United Airlines stopped flying over Iraq more than a week ago.

Meanwhile, Turkish Airlines and Germany's Lufthansa canceled flights to and from the northern Iraqi city of Irbil following the airstrikes. Lufthansa and subsidiary Austrian Airlines said the suspension would continue through Monday, while Turkish Airlines said it has halted Irbil flights until further notice.

Turkish Airlines said it stopped the flights for security reasons after U.S. jets dropped bombs on Islamic militants who were towing artillery outside the Kurdish regional capital near U.S. personnel. The airstrikes targeted the extremist Islamic State group, which controls large areas of Syria and Iraq.

Turkish Airlines' flights to other Iraqi cities were not immediately affected, the company said.

Lufthansa said it already was avoiding Iraqi airspace on flights between Europe, the Middle East and Asia. British Airways also said it was temporarily suspending flights over Iraq "and will keep the situation under review."

The FAA ban comes just three weeks after a Malaysia Airlines plane with nearly 300 people on board was shot down over eastern Ukraine. No warning had been issued to airlines before the shoot down, and other airlines had been flying over the region. U.S. intelligence and aviation officials said the U.S. had no prior intelligence to indicate separatists intended to target civil aircraft, and the first indication that separatists had an operable SA-11 missile system was on July 17, the day of the crash.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Ginsburg Gets Heart Stent to Clear Artery Clog

Wednesday, 26 Nov 2014 11:49 AM

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had a heart stent implanted Wednesday to clear a blocked coronary artery but w . . .

U.S. Regulator Demands Takata Issue National Air-Bag Recall

Wednesday, 26 Nov 2014 11:47 AM

U.S. regulators formally demanded Takata Corp. take part in a nationwide recall of defective air bags, saying the compan . . .

HHS, Corporate Partners Hit Malls to Sell Obamacare

Wednesday, 26 Nov 2014 11:44 AM

The Health and Human Services (HHS) department is launching a campaign targeting shopping malls in an effort to sell Oba . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved