Tags: FDA | stem | cell | therapy

FDA Allows First Test of Human Stem Cell Therapy

Friday, 23 Jan 2009 08:35 AM

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has cleared the way for the world's first study of human embryonic stem cell therapy, Geron Corp said on Friday.

The California biotechnology company plans to start a clinical trial to try to use the stem cells to regrow nerve tissue in patients with acute spinal cord injury.

"This marks the beginning of what is potentially a new chapter in medical therapeutics -- one that reaches beyond pills to a new level of healing: the restoration of organ and tissue function achieved by the injection of healthy replacement cells," Geron Chief Executive Thomas Okarma said in a statement.

Shares of Geron rose nearly 30 percent to $6.75 in premarket electronic trading on Nasdaq.

The FDA rejected his company's first request to conduct the trial of GRNOPC1, Oligodendroglial Progenitor Cells. It put the trial on hold in May.

Former President George W. Bush had been at odds with Congress, researchers and advocates for years over the issue and restricted federal funding of work involving human embryonic stem cells by an executive order.

President Barack Obama, who succeeded Bush on Tuesday, had been widely expected to rescind that directive.

Stem cells are the body's master cells, giving rise to all the tissues, organs and blood. Embryonic stem cells are considered the most powerful kinds of stem cells, as they have the potential to give rise to any type of tissue.

But they are difficult to make, requiring the use of an embryo or cloning technology. Geron and some other companies have been pursuing the goal without the use of federal funds.

Advocates say stem cell-related research could lead to a whole new field of regenerative medicine, in which patients could get transplants and treatments for Parkinson's, juvenile diabetes, cancer, injuries and a range of other ills.

"The neurosurgical community is very excited by this new approach to treating devastating spinal cord injury," said Richard Fessler, professor of neurological surgery at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University.

"If safe and effective, the therapy would provide a viable treatment option for thousands of patients who suffer severe spinal cord injuries each year," he said in a statement.

© Thomson Reuters 2009 All rights reserved

-

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

US Asks NKorea to Release Americans on Humanitarian Concerns

Monday, 01 Sep 2014 08:45 AM

The U.S. government on Monday requested that the North Korean government release three U.S. citizens currently detained  . . .

Obama: 'Revving' Economy Calls for Higher Wages

Monday, 01 Sep 2014 17:22 PM

President Barack Obama renewed his push for Congress to raise the minimum wage Monday in a buoyant accounting of the eco . . .

Cameron: We'll Seize Passports to Fight Jihadists

Monday, 01 Sep 2014 15:00 PM

British Prime Minister David Cameron said he will force airlines to share flight-lists with security services and give p . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved