Tags: Chrysler | CEO

Chrysler to Repay Government Loans Tuesday

Monday, 23 May 2011 06:05 PM

 

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MACOMB TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne said Monday that his company will save $300 million in interest a year when it repays $7.5 billion in U.S. and Canadian government loans on Tuesday.

Chrysler plans to announce the repayment at a Detroit-area auto assembly plant on Tuesday afternoon. Ron Bloom, the Obama administration official who oversaw the restructuring of the auto industry, is among those scheduled to attend.

Marchionne has said that Chrysler is eager to pay back its loans in part because of the governments' high interest rates of around 12 percent, which cost the company $1.2 billion last year.

Under a new loan package announced last week, the company's interest rates will fall to around 6 percent. That will boost the bottom line at Chrysler. The company reported a $116 million profit — its first quarterly profit since its 2009 bankruptcy — in the first quarter.

To pay back the loans, Chrysler is issuing $3.2 billion in bonds and taking out $4.3 billion in bank loans. It also will use a $1.3 billion investment from Italian automaker Fiat SpA. In exchange, Fiat will increase its ownership stake in Chrysler to 46 percent.

The company still owes the U.S. government $2 billion. The government could get some of that back by selling its 8.6 percent stake in Chrysler.

Marchionne, speaking at a grand opening celebration for a Fiat dealership in Macomb Township north of Detroit, said he hasn't discussed with the U.S. government how soon it will sell its stake in Chrysler.

Fiat, which was given management control of Chrysler by the government after the bankruptcy, has an option to buy the government's shares. The government also could sell them in an initial public stock offering.

Marchionne said he expects the government to get out of Chrysler as quickly as possible.

Marchionne said Fiat's stake in Chrysler will rise to 51 percent when Chrysler produces a 40 mpg car in the U.S. starting next year. He said Fiat can raise its stake as high as 76 percent if it exercises all options, including buying part of the 59-percent stake now owned by a health care trust fund for union retirees.

Marchionne said the timing of a public stock offering depends on the needs of the trust fund.

Chrysler got around $10.5 billion from the U.S. to stay alive through bankruptcy. It has repaid some of the money and plans to give the U.S. $5.9 billion on Tuesday.

© Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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