Tags: mccain | obama

Poll: McCain Wins 'Decisive Leader'

Wednesday, 09 Apr 2008 09:14 AM

By Dick Morris

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The USA Today/Gallup Poll of late March suggests a strategy for Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., in the general election. The poll compared Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., and McCain on certain key variables. Here were the results:

Obama prevailed in these categories:

  • Cares about the needs of people like you (66 percent to 54 percent)

  • Shares your values (51 percent to 46 percent)

  • Understands the problems Americans face in their daily lives (67 percent to 55 percent)

    McCain prevailed in these categories:

  • Is a strong, decisive leader (56 percent to 69 percent)

  • Is honest and trustworthy (63 percent to 67 percent)

  • Can manage the government efficiently (48 percent to 60 percent)

    The following categories ended in a statistical tie:

  • Has a clear plan for solving the country’s problems

  • Has a clear vision for the country’s future

  • Would work well with both parties in Washington to get things done

  • Is someone you would be proud to have as president

    So Obama won in the categories of traditional Democrats (and females): virtues of understanding problems and caring about people. McCain won in the usual categories for Republicans (and males): virtues of strong leadership and efficient management.

    in an age of terrorism, weakness is a capital crime. McCain needs to base his campaign on establishing Obama’s weakness and his own strong leadership by comparison.

    It is in this context that we must analyze Obama’s problems with the Rev. Wright and his emerging problems with former terrorist Bill Ayers.

    The American people are not about to judge Obama guilty by association, even with a lowlife type like Ayers and an anti-American like Wright. But they will see, in Obama’s tentativeness in handling these controversies and his “decency” in refusing to cut off his relationships and condemn these men, a sign of weakness that will hurt his campaign.

    There is in Obama something of the Democratic candidate for president in the 1950s, Adlai Stevenson. Both from Illinois, they share an eloquence that lifts them above normal political figures and a profundity of thought that lies behind it. But each was seen as weak, and Stevenson as indecisive.

    Obama’s over-intellectualization of issues and of the problems that crop up in his campaign will increasingly harden into a perception of a lack of sufficient strength to deal with America’s problems.

    The right wing tried to attack John Kerry in 2004 for a lack of patriotism and commitment to American values, just as it is now doing to Obama. It likely fell short of its goal. But the pressure it brought to bear on Kerry, through the Swift Boat ad and other attacks, led people to conclude that Kerry flip-flopped on issues and led them to discount what he said during his campaign.

    Similarly, Americans will not buy that Obama is un-American. But the pressure the right brings to bear on him will cause him to appear weak in the face of attacks.

    McCain needs to hammer away at the issue of strength and leadership and deal decisively with the problems that crop up in the campaign, while Obama dithers, thinks things through and tries to parse hairs in his responses.

    Here the Iraq issue opens a real opportunity for McCain, where otherwise his support for the war would be a real negative. Iraq is a lot like Social Security. Everyone knows there is a problem, but any solution is immediately shot down.

    The issue earned the label “the third rail” in our politics, a status that was underscored when Bush’s momentum from his 2004 re-election was smashed against the rocks of Democratic and elderly opposition to his Social Security reform plan.

    So it is with Iraq: He who proposes an alternative is doomed. McCain’s position, that we have to stay until we win, is far from popular, but it’s a lot better than unilateral and immediate withdrawal.

    And Obama’s opposition to the war begs a host of questions: Shall we retain any presence? What about al-Qaida? What happens if the government falls? Can we let Iran take over?

    Obama will dither and seem far from decisive as he answers each of these questions. They will make him look terrible, just as Kerry — in opposing the war after voting for it — looked like a flip-flopper.

    McCain can use the predisposition of voters to see Obama as weak, coupled with the Iraq issue, to make the strength issue his key advantage.

    © 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

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