Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Computerized tomography (CT) coronary angiography is proving useful for the difficult problem of determining whether a patient with chest pain is at risk for a heart attack. [Full Story]
Computerized tomography (CT) coronary angiography is proving useful for the difficult problem of determining whether a patient with chest pain is at risk for a heart attack. [Full Story]
Sudden cardiac arrest may not be so sudden. According to one study, warning signs may occur in the hours, days, or even weeks before. [Full Story]
Snacking is important, but you need to choose your snacks wisely and eat them in small portions to get the best benefit. [Full Story]
Your doctor needs to know what medications you’re on in order to make any prescription changes or check for interactions between drugs. [Full Story]
“Pumphead,” also called postperfusion syndrome, is the name given to a constellation of neurological symptoms that can result from complications of open-heart surgery. [Full Story]
If you are on high blood pressure or heart medication, remember that you may feel the effects of heat more keenly, so take extra precautions. [Full Story]
A Canadian study looked at people age 66 and older who were taking a calcium channel blocker, which is often used to treat high blood pressure. [Full Story]
Half of all heart disease deaths in the U.S. , the number one killer of both American men and women , could be prevented if Americans took the proper precautions. [Full Story]
In the U.S., about 100,000 people die each year from infections they acquire in a hospital. But infections can also occur if you’re undergoing an outpatient procedure. [Full Story]

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