Tags: wine | arsenic | lawsuit | California

Popular Wines Have High Arsenic Levels: Lawsuit

Thursday, 19 Mar 2015 12:30 PM


A number of the most popular wines in the United States have high levels of arsenic, according to a class action lawsuit.

The lawsuit to be filed Thursday in California claims that some wines have up to four or five times the maximum amount of arsenic the Environmental Protection Agency allows in drinking water, CBS News reported.

More than 24 California winemakers and sellers misrepresent their wine as safe, according to the lawsuit.

The products include Trader Joe's Two-Buck Chuck White Zinfandel, Mnage Trois Moscato and a Franzia Blush, which had three, four and five times the EPA limit for arsenic in drinking water, according to tests conducted by BeverageGrades, a laboratory that analyzes wine, CBS News reported.

One of the companies named in the lawsuit is The Wine Group. A company spokesman said it "would not be inaccurate or responsible" to use the EPA's water standard as a baseline because people typically drink more water than wine.

He also told CBS News that the highest level of arsenic noted in the lawsuit is "only half of Canada's standard for wine, of 100 parts per billion," CBS News reported.

Treasury Wines is also named in the lawsuit and said its wines "are fully compliant with all relevant federal and state guidelines." Trader Joe's told CBS News "the concerns raised in your inquiry are serious and are being treated as such. We are investigating the matter with several of our wine producing suppliers."
 

© HealthDay

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A number of the most popular wines in the United States have high levels of arsenic, according to a class action lawsuit. The lawsuit to be filed Thursday in California claims that some wines have up to four or five times the maximum amount of arsenic the Environmental...
wine, arsenic, lawsuit, California
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2015-30-19
 

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