Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: gulf war syndrome | CoQ10 | pesticides

CoQ10 Helps Gulf War Syndrome

By Dr. Crandall
Thursday, 28 Apr 2016 03:20 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Researchers are finding that CoQ10 may be helpful for treating U.S. Veterans afflicted with the set of chronic conditions that have become known as “Gulf War Syndrome,” or “Gulf War Illness.”

Gulf War Syndrome is associated with exposure to chemicals such as pesticides, or pills given to soldiers to protect them from possible nerve agents. These chemicals can damage mitochondria, which generate the energy our cells need to do their jobs.

When these powerhouses of the cells are disrupted, it can produce symptoms compatible with those seen in this illness.

Symptoms of Gulf War Syndrome include those found in chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, and functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional dyspepsia, and functional abdominal pain syndrome, among others.

San Diego School of Medicine researchers conducted a study on 41 veterans diagnosed with Gulf War Syndrome. Over the course of the study, half received either a high-quality CoQ10 supplement or a placebo.

The researchers found that 80 percent of those who received 100 mg of CoQ10 had an improvement in physical function, and that the improvement correlated with the degree to which CoQ10 was increased in the bloodstream.

The study was published in the journal Neural Computation
 

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Researchers are finding that CoQ10 may be helpful for treating U.S. Veterans afflicted with the set of chronic conditions that have become known as “Gulf War Syndrome,” or “Gulf War Illness.”
gulf war syndrome, CoQ10, pesticides
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2016-20-28
 

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