Vitamin D Alone Doesn't Help Women's Bones: Study

Tuesday, 24 Sep 2013 03:00 PM

 

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
    A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Calcium supplements improve bone health in postmenopausal women, but vitamin D supplements provide no benefit in women with normal vitamin D levels, a new study finds.

"These findings suggest that vitamin D supplements over the recommended dietary allowance do not protect bone health, whereas calcium supplements do have an effect," study lead author Dr. John Aloia, of Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y., said in a news release from the Endocrine Society.

For the study, published Sept. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, the researchers examined bone turnover in 159 postmenopausal women. Bone turnover is the body's natural process for breaking down old bone. Young people produce enough new bone to replace what is lost, but bone mass in women begins to decline after age 30, and this loss speeds up after menopause.

The women in the study were divided into four groups: one group received a combination of vitamin D and calcium; one group took 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily; one group took 4,000 IU of vitamin D daily; and one group took an inactive placebo. Levels of bone turnover markers, such as parathyroid hormone levels in the blood, were assessed for six months.

There was a significant decline in bone turnover markers among women who took daily calcium supplements. The vitamin D supplements had no effect on bone turnover markers, the researchers reported.

"Vitamin D and calcium interact to suppress bone turnover by decreasing parathyroid hormone levels," said Aloia in the news release. "This can be beneficial in women who are vitamin D deficient. In women who already are receiving the recommended daily allowance of vitamin D, however, the study found there was no advantage to adding a vitamin D supplement."

Aloia added: "Women do need to be cautious about the possibility of vascular side effects from too much calcium and should consult their physicians about whether their diet is adequate or whether they should take supplements at all."

By 2020, half of all Americans over age 50 are expected to have low bone density or osteoporosis, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. This can lead to painful and debilitating fractures.

© HealthDay

  Comment  |
   Contact  |
  Print   |
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Diagnose Your Kid's Ear Infection With Your iPhone

Friday, 19 Dec 2014 16:15 PM

Diagnosing your kid's ear infections might soon be as simple as taking a video on your smartphone. . . .

Revlon Removing Some Dangerous Chemicals From Cosmetics

Friday, 19 Dec 2014 16:11 PM

Revlon announced that it will no longer use two chemical ingredients in its products, responding to a consumer petition  . . .

New Ovarian Cancer Drug Gets FDA OK

Friday, 19 Dec 2014 15:48 PM

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to treat advanced ovarian cancer, along with a test to ide . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved