Mom's Smoking During Pregnancy Tied to Teens' Hearing Loss

Thursday, 20 Jun 2013 05:10 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Add another hazard to the long list of reasons not to smoke during pregnancy: Children exposed to tobacco smoke in the womb may be at higher risk for hearing loss.
 
Researchers examined data from almost 1,000 children aged 12 to 15 who took part in the 2005 to 2006 U.S. National Health Examination Survey. They found that about 16 percent of them had been exposed to tobacco smoke while in the womb.
 
These adolescents had evidence of some overall hearing loss and were nearly three times more likely to have one-sided, low-frequency hearing loss compared to youngsters without such exposures, according to the study published online June 20 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.
 
The level of hearing impairment associated with fetal exposure to tobacco smoke was "relatively modest" at less than three decibels, wrote a team led by Dr. Michael Weitzman, of the NYU School of Medicine in New York City. "[However], an almost three-fold increased odds of unilateral hearing loss in adolescents with prenatal smoke exposure is worrisome," they wrote.
 
The study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between smoking during pregnancy and hearing outcomes in offspring, only an association. Two hearing experts, however, said they weren't surprised by the findings.
 
"This is an effect which has been described previously for the adult population, so it is logical that it would also apply to children of smokers," said Dr. Ian Storper, director of otology at the Center for Hearing and Balance Disorders at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.
 
Storper said the study "provides more reason to eliminate tobacco usage across our population and to continue research in the area to understand the mechanism of damage to the auditory system."
 
Dr. Martin Chavez, director of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Winthrop University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y., agreed, noting that fetal exposure to toxins "can have lifelong consequences."

The new study "proves that not smoking or avoiding being around others who smoke can [not only] increase the likelihood of a healthy newborn, but also decrease the chances of other diseases later on," Chavez said.

© HealthDay

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
You May Also Like

Late Flu Wave Hits Northeast

Saturday, 19 Apr 2014 09:46 AM

A second, milder wave of flu is hitting the Northeast. Months ago, the flu season seemed to be winding down. But healt . . .

Singer Debbie Gibson Reveals Battle With Lyme Disease

Friday, 18 Apr 2014 17:07 PM

Singer Debbie Gibson says that he was diagnosed last year with Lyme disease, a tick-borne illness that can cause joint p . . .

Food Poisoning Strikes Food Safety Meeting

Friday, 18 Apr 2014 16:43 PM

Maryland health officials are investigating a suspected outbreak of food poisoning among government and business leaders . . .

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved