Obesity Linked to High Food Prices

Friday, 29 Mar 2013 12:00 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Food prices have dropped since peaking six months ago but remain near record levels, pushing the world's poorest people toward "undernutrition" and obesity, the World Bank says.
 
"Unhealthy food tends to be cheaper than healthy ones, like junk food in developed countries," said Otaviano Canuto, World Bank Group's vice president for poverty reduction and economic management.
 
"When poor people with some disposable income in developing countries try to cope with high and increasingly volatile food prices, they also tend to choose cheap food that is high in calories but without much nutritious value."

Special:
These 5 Things Flush 40 lbs. of Fat Out of Your Body.
 
Between October and February, world food prices dropped by four percent overall, driven in part by wheat (minus 11 percent) and sugar (minus 10 percent), due to weaker demand for wheat feed and reduced maize consumption for ethanol as well as improved harvest conditions, according to the World Bank.
 
But they remain at very high levels and are just nine percent less than historic levels in August.
 
In February alone, prices increased one percent overall for a year-long period. The increases were especially notable for rice and corn (five percent each), two staple foods in many developing countries.
 
The World Bank also worried about "uncertainties" that remain in the world food supply.
 
Last year, global stocks of cereals dropped by three percent, mostly driven by a decline in the supply of wheat and coarse grains. Persistently dry conditions in Argentina, Australia and South Africa could also further hamper supplies in the months ahead.
 
Meanwhile, oil prices have been rising for three consecutive months, reaching their highest levels in February since April.
 
"In the 'new normal' of high and volatile food prices, millions will continue to suffer from poor nutrition, whether it is hunger, undernutrition or obesity which can cause premature death," the bank stressed.
 
In 2008, there were 1.46 billion overweight adults, including 508 million who were obese.
That number could rise to 2.16 billion for overweight adults, and nearly double to 1.12 billion for the obese by 2030 across all regions and in fast-developing nations such as China and India, said the bank in citing "even conservative estimates."
 
"Half of the world's overweight people live in just nine countries -- China, United States, Germany, India, Russia, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia and Turkey -- evidence that obesity is not an epidemic restricted only to rich countries," added Canuto.
 

© AFP 2014

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

Light Drinking Boosts Memory: Study

Thursday, 23 Oct 2014 18:35 PM

A surprising new study suggests light drinking may actually help you remember things better later in life. . . .

Obamacare Regs Have Doctors Drowning in Paperwork: Harvard

Thursday, 23 Oct 2014 17:36 PM

Paperwork now consumes about one-sixth of a typical America physician's day - impinging on the time doctors can spend ca . . .

Popular Prostate Cancer Treatment May Do More Harm Than Good

Thursday, 23 Oct 2014 17:30 PM

A common treatment for prostate cancer - androgen deprivation (ADT) - may cause more harm than good for some patients, n . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved