Blood Thinner Dangerous for Heart Valve Patients

Thursday, 26 Sep 2013 04:50 PM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
When used by patients with mechanical heart valves, the blood thinner Pradaxa raises the risk of both dangerous clots and bleeding around the heart, a new study says.

The bottom line for lead researcher Frans Van de Werf, M.D., chairman of the department of cardiovascular medicine at the University Hospitals Leuven in Belgium, is "don't use Pradaxa in patients with a mechanical valve."
 
In fact, the trial was halted early and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration subsequently issued a "black box" warning that said this particular group of heart patients should not take Pradaxa because of an increased chance of a stroke or heart attack.

SPECIAL: These 4 Things Happen Right Before a Heart Attack — Read More.
 
Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a drug that prevents clotting. It has been approved as an alternative to warfarin for patients with an abnormal heartbeat called atrial fibrillation, the researchers noted.
 
"It was hoped that a novel oral direct clotting inhibitor would provide similar or better protection for patients with mechanical heart valves without the need for [the] monitoring or dietary restrictions associated with warfarin," said Gregg Fonarow, M.D., a professor of cardiology at the University of California, Los Angeles.
 
After a heart valve replacement, patients are typically put on blood thinners or drugs that combat clotting to prevent a heart attack or stroke, but the danger of these drugs is a risk for severe bleeding.
 
"While the vitamin K antagonist warfarin is very effective at preventing clotting-related complications of mechanical heart valves, its use requires lifetime monitoring, with at least monthly blood tests, dietary restrictions and the potential for multiple medication interactions," Dr. Fonarow explained.
 
Unfortunately, this randomized clinical trial showed that Pradaxa was even more problematic than warfarin in terms of side effects, he said.
 
"As a result of these findings, the FDA added a 'black box' warning to the medication label warning against using dabigatran and similar medications in patients with mechanical heart valves," Dr. Fonarow said.
 
The report was published in the New England Journal of Medicine and the trial was funded by Boehringer Ingelheim, the maker of Pradaxa.

Special: Warning Signs of a 'Silent' Heart Attack
 
For the study, an international team of researchers randomly assigned 252 patients who had an aortic or mitral valve replacement to either Pradaxa or warfarin. Some patients had the valve replacement within a week before the study began and others had the surgery three months earlier, the researchers noted.
 
Of those taking Pradaxa, 32 percent had their treatment stopped or dose changed. In addition, 5 percent of those on the drug suffered a stroke, compared with none of those taking warfarin.
 
Moreover, 4 percent of those taking Pradaxa had major bleeding around the heart, compared with 2 percent of those taking warfarin, the researchers found.

© HealthDay

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Country
Zip Code:
Privacy: We never share your email.
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
Top Stories
You May Also Like

1 in 25 Americans Is Cancer Survivor: Report

Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 17:04 PM

About 14.5 million U.S. cancer survivors are alive today, compared to just 3 million in 1971, the American Association f . . .

Black Lung Disease Makes Comeback

Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 16:58 PM

Coal miners are suffering rates of severe black lung disease not seen since coal dust was first regulated about 40 years . . .

Painkiller Deaths Up 400 Percent in Last 10 Years

Tuesday, 16 Sep 2014 16:57 PM

The number of Americans dying from accidental overdoses of narcotic painkillers jumped significantly from 1999 to 2011,  . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved