Mondays, Mornings Best Times for Heart Care

Tuesday, 28 May 2013 07:30 AM

 

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Patients hospitalized for heart failure appear to have better odds of survival if they're admitted on Mondays or in the morning, a new study finds.
 
Death rates and length of stay are highest among heart failure patients admitted in January, on Fridays and overnight, according to the researchers, who are scheduled to present their findings Saturday in Portugal at the annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.
 
"The fact that patients admitted right before the weekend and in the middle of the night do worse and are in the hospital longer suggests that staffing levels may contribute to the findings," Dr. David Kao, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said in a news release from the cardiology society.
 
"Doctors and hospitals need to be more vigilant during these higher-risk times and ensure that adequate resources are in place to cope with demand," Kao said. "Patients should be aware that their disease is not the same over the course of the year, and they may be at higher risk during the winter. People often avoid coming into the hospital during the holidays because of family pressures and a personal desire to stay at home, but they may be putting themselves in danger."
 
The study involved 14 years of data on more than 900,000 patients with congestive heart failure, a condition in which the heart doesn't properly pump blood to the rest of the body. All of the patients were admitted to hospitals in New York between 1994 and 2007. The researchers analyzed the effect the hour, day and month of the patients' admissions had on death rates and the length of time they spent in the hospital.
 
Patients admitted between 6 a.m. and noon fared better than evening admissions, the study found.
 
Although heart failure admissions have increased, the researchers found that death rates and length of hospital stays have declined. "These findings confirm the huge decline in mortality in hospitals for heart failure over the past 14 or 15 years following major advances in therapy," Kao said.
 
The researchers said the seasonal spike in heart failure deaths and longer admissions was not the result of a surge in drug and alcohol abuse during the holidays, as some have suggested. "For the first time, we've shown that there wasn't a higher rate of alcohol and drug use reported in heart failure patients during December and January, when heart failure mortality was the highest," Kao said.
 
The researchers said greater numbers of heart failure patients who also had pneumonia during the winter could have played a role in their findings. Other respiratory illnesses, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), had less seasonal variation.
 
"The seasonal effect on in-hospital death from heart failure remained even after controlling for time and day of admission; 17 other medical conditions, including substance use, kidney disease and pneumonia; and demographic factors, including gender, ethnicity and medical-coverage status," Kao said. "Seasonal variations in morbidity and mortality occur in many diseases, particularly heart disease, and the cold weather itself may have a part to play."
 
Data and conclusions presented at meetings typically are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

© HealthDay

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
You May Also Like

Two Ebola Patients Coming to US

Friday, 01 Aug 2014 17:12 PM

Two American aid workers, both seriously ill after being infected with the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia, will be flown  . . .

New Type 2 Diabetes Drug Gets FDA OK

Friday, 01 Aug 2014 16:11 PM

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Friday that itapproved a new drug, Jardiance, to help fight Type 2 di . . .

Why Isn't There a Vaccine or Treatment for Ebola?

Friday, 01 Aug 2014 16:01 PM

In the four decades since the Ebola virus was first identified in Africa, treatment hasn't changed much. There are no li . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved