Tags: Kiplinger | yield | dividend | stocks

Kiplinger: 8 Unknown Dividend Stocks

Wednesday, 27 Aug 2014 02:08 PM

By Dan Weil

With interest rates likely to remain below historical averages for years, dividend stocks remain an attractive alternative for income-oriented investments.

Kiplinger lists eight strong dividend stocks that you might not have heard of before. All of them have raised their dividend for at least each of the last 20 years.

"A lot of them probably get overlooked because they're just sort of boring," says Sam Stovall, chief equity strategist for S&P Capital IQ's stock research group, tells Kiplinger.

Editor’s Note:
Retire 10 Years Earlier With These 4 Stocks

  • Aqua America (WTR), a holding company for water and wastewater utilities. Dividend yield: 2.7 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 23.
  • Becton, Dickinson (BDX), a medical supplies manufacturer. Dividend yield: 1.9 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 42.
  • Dover (DOV), an industrial components maker. Dividend yield: 1.8 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 59.
  • Genuine Parts (GPC), a car parts distributor. Dividend yield: 2.6 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 58.
  • Helmerich & Payne (HP), an energy drilling contractor. Dividend yield: 2.7 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 42.
  • T. Rowe Price (TROW), a money manager. Dividend yield: 2.2 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 28.
  • UGI (UGI), an energy conglomerate. Dividend yield: 2.2 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 27.
  • V.F. Corporation (VFC), an apparel manufacturer. Dividend yield: 1.6 percent. Years of consecutive dividend increases: 41.
To be sure, dividend stocks might fall when the Federal Reserve finally raises interest rates. But that's no reason to abandon the stocks, says Josh Peters, director of equity-income strategy for Morningstar.

"Mentally you have to be willing to accept more interest-rate risk in a high-income strategy than you would have with perhaps a more speculative strategy," he says on Morningstar.com.

"I think it's a good trade-off because, yes, I take more interest-rate risk when I own lots of utilities, lots of food stocks, companies that don't respond a great deal one way or the other to changes in economic activity. But I get a 2-for-1 bargain."

Editor’s Note: Retire 10 Years Earlier With These 4 Stocks

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